Cost and turnaround time

If sampled by Multitest

Cost including report and laboratory certificate:

  • Report (complies with CNESST requirements) and sampling:
    • $195 for 6 samples or less
    • $25 per additional sample
  • Laboratory analysis:
    • $100 per analyzed sample, $80 per sample (9 samples or more)
    • $150 for resilient flooring

If sampled by the client

Cost including report and laboratory certificate:

  • Report: $95
  • Laboratory analysis:
    • $100 per analyzed sample, $80 per sample (9 samples or more)
    • $150 for resilient flooring

Turnaround time

  • Results available in 1 to 2 business days (7 days for resilient flooring)
  • Emergency service available

Questions? Appointment?

You can call us at 514 990-2063 or fill out the form below and we will contact you as soon as possible.

Test quality and
credibility

The test has greater credibility if the samples are taken by Multitest—this guarantees the origin of the samples referenced in the written report.

The laboratory carrying out our analysis is recognized by the Institut Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail (IRSST). Multitest as well as the laboratory are covered by an errors and omissions liability insurance.

What is it exactly?

Various construction materials may contain asbestos: drywall, joint compound, plaster/cement, textured finish (stucco), mortar, insulation, duct and pipe insulation, resilient floorings, acoustic tiles (suspended ceilings), etc.

The test consists in verifying whether these materials contain asbestos. Québec regulations consider any materials with an asbestos concentration of at least 0.1% as materials containing asbestos that may be hazardous to health.

An air test is recommended after performing work that involves materials containing asbestos.
Click here for further details about air testing.

Learn more about our asbestos tests for materials

Purpose of asbestos testing

Asbestos testing consists in performing laboratory testing of material samples to determine whether they contain asbestos, and if so, the type and quantity. The acceptable threshold (standard) is less than 0.1% under Québec regulations (Regulation Respecting Occupational Health and Safety, S-2.1, r.13).

Asbestos testing methodology

Technical evaluation is performed in accordance with the analytical method prescribed in Québec—method 244 of the Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail (IRSST) for materials and method 198.4 of the Environmental Laboratory Approval Program (ELAP) for resilient floorings. The evaluation consists in determining whether asbestos fibres are present in the samples submitted for analysis.

  1. Sampling:  Using protective equipment, the Multitest technician carefully takes a number of samples (according to the type of material) from one or more homogeneous sampling areas. The technician writes down his observations and notes the location of the samples on a diagram. This document will be included in the final report.
  2. Laboratory analysis: The chemist determines whether the tested material contains asbestos.
  3. Written report: Multitest provides a summary report that includes our recommendations, the laboratory certificate of analysis and our sampling report.

Number of samples to be analyzed according to CNESST

The number of samples to be analyzed to confirm the absence of asbestos in a material likely to contain it depends on the type of material concerned.

Thus, for on-site mixed materials such as walls made of plaster/cement, joint compound, cement parging or mortar, the CNESST requires 9 negative samples from each homogeneous sampling area (also called zone presenting similarities of construction) in order to conclude that such area is free of asbestos and that work likely to generate dust does not have to be carried out under asbestos removal conditions.

In the case of manufactured materials such as resilient floorings, acoustic tiles (suspended ceiling) or roof shingles, the CNESST requires only 1 sample of each model and each brand.

Different quantities of samples are required for other materials such as lagging (also called heat insulation on pipes and equipment). Please contact us as needed.

For further details, please consult the following free online guide:

  • Gestion sécuritaire de l’amiante by CNESST (available in French only).

What is it exactly?

Because it offers many attractive properties (incombustible, good thermal/electrical/acoustic insulator, etc.), asbestos was used extensively from around 1930 to 1980. However, it became apparent over time that asbestos could cause serious health issues.

It is only since December 30, 2018 that asbestos is formally banned in Canada. Even so, large amounts of asbestos remain in buildings (walls, ceilings, insulation, pipe insulation, floor coverings, acoustic tiles, joint compound, etc.).

Health risks

Asbestos is a health hazard when fibres detach from materials and become airborne. If the fibres are inhaled they enter the respiratory system and can cause serious health issues after several years (asbestosis, lung cancer, mesothelioma, etc.). Airborne asbestos fibres are 400 to 2,000 times smaller than a human hair and are invisible to the naked eye.

Materials containing asbestos may be hazardous when they give off dust because of deterioration or as a result of work (maintenance, repairs, renovations, demolition, etc.). Health Canada notes on its website that materials containing asbestos do not pose a significant health risk if they are in good condition and no work is planned.

Materials likely to contain asbestos

Various building components (walls, ceilings, insulation, floor coverings, etc.) could be made of materials likely to containing asbestos. These include drywall, joint compound, plaster/cement, textured finish (stucco), mortar, parging, pipe insulation, resilient floorings and acoustic tiles.

Work safeguards

When a material is deemed to contain asbestos—regardless of percentage or type of asbestos fibre—safeguards specified by regulations must be used to protect workers and, indirectly, the occupants of the building concerned in cases where asbestos fibres could become airborne when such material is handled.

The applicable safeguards vary according to the type of asbestos-containing material and the scope of the work concerned, and may include wearing a mask or half-mask with P100 (HEPA) filters, wearing protective clothing and setting up an airtight enclosure.

For further details, please consult the following free online guide:

  • Guide de prévention amiante by ASP Construction (available in French only).

Impact on property value

Even though Health Canada’s opinion is that materials containing asbestos do not pose a significant health risk if no fibres are released into the air, the value of buildings concerned is affected. Certain buyers:

  • Do not want to be faced with this problem when they later have to sell;
  • Are concerned about possible risks to their health; or
  • Plan to carry out renovations that would disturb the materials in question.

The cost to remove materials containing asbestos varies according to the type and quantity of the materials to be removed and the specific characteristics of the building concerned. Each case is specific. We do not perform this type of work. However, we can refer you to contractors if necessary.

Which buildings are affected?

Buildings constructed or renovated before 1990 are more likely to be constructed with some asbestos-containing materials, particularly since the use of asbestos declined from the early 1980s. There is no consensus on a specific date, in part because acceptable standards for asbestos vary by province, state and country. However, it is important to note that asbestos is only banned in Canada as of December 30, 2018.

How many buildings are affected?

Unfortunately, there is no reliable and accurate data available on this subject. Several hundred thousand buildings in Canada and the United States contain asbestos.

What are the affected regions?

All of Québec, Canada and the United States are affected. Multitest can arrange for the analysis of samples of materials likely to contain asbestos from anywhere in Québec.

Cost of remediation work

The cost to remove materials containing asbestos varies according to the type and quantity of the materials to be removed and the specific characteristics of the building concerned. Each case is specific. We do not perform this type of work. However, we can refer you to contractors if necessary.

Additional information online

For more information about asbestos, please visit the following organizations’ websites:

You can also consult the following free online guides:

  • Gestion sécuritaire de l’amiante by CNESST (available in French only);
  • Guide de prévention amiante by ASP Construction (available in French only).

FAQ on asbestos materials testing

What does asbestos testing involve?

Technical evaluation is performed in accordance with the analytical method prescribed in Québec—method 244 of the Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail (IRSST) for materials and method 198.4 of the Environmental Laboratory Approval Program (ELAP) for resilient floorings. The evaluation consists in determining whether asbestos fibres are present in the samples submitted for analysis.

  • Sampling: Using protective equipment, the Multitest technician carefully takes a number of samples (according to the type of material) from one or more homogeneous sampling areas. The technician writes down his observations and notes the location of the samples on a diagram. This document will be included in the final report.
  • Laboratory analysis: The chemist determines whether the tested material contains asbestos.
  • Written report: Multitest provides a summary report that includes our recommendations, the laboratory certificate of analysis and our sampling report.

Can i choose a testing time?

No. We will contact you the business day before the test to confirm an appointment time.

How long will your technician be on site?

It takes about 10 minutes for each sample (for example, 30 minutes for 3 samples).

Is there a risk to my health when the sample is taken?

No.

What is the acceptable percentage of asbestos?

Less than 0.1%.

If asbestos is present in the tested material, does it pose a health hazard?

Asbestos is a health hazard when fibres detach from materials (become airborne). If the fibres are inhaled they enter the respiratory system and can cause serious health issues after several years (asbestosis, lung cancer, mesothelioma, etc.). Airborne asbestos fibres are 400 to 2,000 times thinner than a human hair and are invisible to the naked eye.

Materials containing asbestos could have health consequences if work (maintenance, repair, renovation, demolition, etc.) or their condition is likely to result in dust being produced by these materials through direct or indirect action. Health Canada notes on its web site that materials containing asbestos do not pose a significant health risk if they are in good condition and no work is planned.

Am I required to remove asbestos-containing materials from my building?

No, there is no law requiring the removal of such materials as long as they are in good condition and are not affected by work that may emit dust.

How many samples have to be analyzed?

The number of samples to be analyzed to confirm the absence of asbestos in a material likely to contain it depends on the type of material concerned.

Thus, for on-site mixed materials such as walls made of plaster/cement, joint compound, cement parging or mortar, the CNESST requires 9 negative samples from each homogeneous sampling area (also called zone presenting similarities of construction) in order to conclude that such area is free of asbestos and that work likely to generate dust does not have to be carried out under asbestos removal conditions.

In the case of manufactured materials such as resilient floorings, acoustic tiles (suspended ceiling) or roof shingles, the CNESST requires only 1 sample of each model and each brand.

Different quantities of samples are required for other materials such as lagging (also called heat insulation on pipes and equipment). Please contact us as needed.

For further details, please consult the following free online guide:

  • Gestion sécuritaire de l’amiante by CNESST (available in French only).

How should i take the sample?

We do not recommend taking samples yourself. However, if you decide to do so, please contact us for the recommended method and precautions.

Do you carry out remediation work if the test result is positive?

We do not perform this type of work. However, we can refer you to contractors if necessary.

Some testimonials from our clients

“Excellent service and results obtained very quickly (the next day!) to test the presence of asbestos in a material. Thank you so much!!”

Alexandre Côté, Blainville

“Many thanks for your excellent service and the speed of your results. I regularly refer Multitest to my clients and this file confirms once again why I recommend you.”

Stéphane Dufour, building inspector │ L’inspecteur Urbain – building consulting services

“Quick availability for our tests, competent and rigorous professionals, clear reports… what more could you ask for. We do business with Multitest regularly and are very satisfied, thanks to all your team :)”

Martin Forgues, partner │ Aire D3 inc. – decontamination services

“Pleasant experience from the time I called to take appointment to the delivery of the results. Fast and professional service. The technicians cleaned up after the tests and left everything the way it was.”

Tony Kababejian, Google review, Greater Montréal

“Ultra professional and competent service. They took the time to listen to my situation and explain to me what applied to standards and show me the tests that could be done. There is no pressure to sell tests that you don’t need. You really feel like they’re looking to do what’s best for the customer without artificially inflating the bill.

In the construction industry, where we are often confronted with profiteering or downright dishonest individuals, this kind of service gives faith in humanity!”

Thanak, Google review, Greater Montréal

Main areas served by our asbestos experts

North Shore of Montreal

We serve the North Shore of Montreal, including Laval, Mascouche, Terrebonne, Mirabel, Saint-Jérôme, Le Gardeur, Deux-Montagnes, Saint-Eustache, Pointe-Calumet, Saint-Joseph-du-Lac, Sainte-Marthe-sur-le-Lac, Blainville, Boisbriand, Bois-des-Filion, Lorraine, Rosemère, Sainte-Anne-des-Plaines, Sainte-Thérèse, Charlemagne, L’Assomption, Repentigny, Saint-Sulpice and L’Épiphanie.

City of Montreal

We serve the greater city of Montreal, including the following boroughs: Ahuntsic-Cartierville, Anjou, Côte-des-Neiges–Notre-Dame-de-Grâce, Lachine, LaSalle, Le Plateau-Mont-Royal, Le Sud-Ouest, L’Île-Bizard–Sainte-Geneviève, Mercier–Hochelaga-Maisonneuve, Montréal-Nord, Outremont, Pierrefonds-Roxboro, Rivière-des-Prairies–Pointe-aux-Trembles, Rosemont–La Petite-Patrie, Saint-Laurent, Saint-Léonard, Verdun, Ville-Marie and Villeray–Saint-Michel–Parc-Extension.

South Shore of Montreal

We serve a large portion of Montérégie, including Longueuil, Greenfield Park, Saint-Hubert, Brossard, Belœil, Boucherville, Candiac, Carignan, Chambly, Châteauguay, Delson, La Prairie, McMasterville, Mont-Saint-Hilaire, Otterburn Park, Saint-Basile-le-Grand, Saint-Bruno-de-Montarville, Sainte-Catherine, Saint-Constant, Saint-Isidore, Sainte-Julie, Saint-Lambert, Saint-Philippe, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu and Varennes.